Consolidated cash flow statement

Consolidated cash flow statement – Currency issues

 By Jean-Luc Squifflet, Senior Consultant, Sigma Conso

 

Why is it so difficult to prepare consolidated cash flow statements without variances when all of the statements prepared at the entity level are correct?

And, why does it take so much time?

 

These questions arise periodically at the time annual financial statements are prepared. We’ll try to answer them in this article.

To do so, we’ll present a series of problems which arise when preparing a consolidated cash flow statement and which, on the other hand, do not appear in the individual statements prepared for each company in the group.

Our goal in this article is not to provide an exhaustive description of all of the problems encountered, but simply to explain to readers the difficulties involved in moving from an individual cash flow statement to a consolidated statement.

We’ll begin with a brief theory refresher.

The purpose of the cash flow statement is to explain the changes in cash between two accounting years.

These changes are allocated to three categories: cash flows from operating activities, cash flows from investing activities and cash flows from financing activities.

The cash flow statement is prepared based on the movements of the year in the balance sheet accounts and the information contained in the income statement.

To translate these movements, consolidation managers use the concept of “flow” to identify the changes in each balance sheet item with an impact on cash (cash movements) and those with no impact, such as currency fluctuations and inflows and outflows from the scope (non-cash movements).

At this point, we can already identify a major difference between the individual cash flow statement and the consolidated cash flow statement.

The individual statement is created in local currency whereas the consolidated statement is prepared in the group currency.

As they show variations between two financial periods, the default exchange rate used to convert the flows is the average rate for the period.

This means that the change in cash is converted at the average rate as are the cash movements included in the consolidated cash flow statement.

This is where things get more complicated, because the average rate is not used for certain transactions.

We’ll look at different examples which show that cash conversions at a different rate than the average rate can create problems for the preparation of the consolidated cash flow statement.

 

Dividends paid to minority shareholders in a foreign currency.

Given that the dividends distributed within the group are eliminated on consolidation, only dividends paid to third parties will appear in the consolidated cash flow statement.

As this is a distribution of income from the previous year, the rate used to convert the dividend in a foreign currency into the group’s currency will normally be the average rate of the preceding financial year.

On the other hand, the change in cash associated with the dividend payment will be converted at the average rate for the current financial year.

Let’s look at an example to illustrate what this does to the consolidated cash flow statement.

Company M in € holds 80% of an American subsidiary.

During financial year N, F distributes USD100 in dividends for the income of financial year N-1. The average exchange rate for the current financial year is 0.7. It is 0.9 for N-1.

 

F in $F in €M + F in €
Dividend paid-100-90 (-100 $ * 0.9)-18 (-90 * 20%)
Change in cash-100-70 (-100 $ * 0.7)-14 (-70 * 20%)
Difference0+20+4

 

Capital increases in a foreign currency subscribed by third parties

Let’s take another look at our example in which M owns 80% of American subsidiary F.

Let’s assume that F carries out a capital increase of $100,000 to which M subscribes in the amount of its percentage.

The consolidated cash flow statement will only show the share of the third parties in the capital increase, i.e. an external cash contribution of $20,000.

If the change in F’s shareholders’ equity is converted at the average rate, there won’t be a cash flow problem. However, a transaction rate (also called historical rate) is often used to convert the capital increase into the group currency.

In our example, we’ll use 0.75 as the rate of the day for the transaction and 0.8 as the average rate for the year. The latter rate will be used for the conversion of the change in cash.

 

F in $F in €M + F in €
Capital increase+100.000+75.000 (100.000$ * 0.75)15.000 (75 K€ *20%)
Change in cash+100.000+80.000 (100.000$ * 0.8)16.000 (80K€ * 20%)
Difference0+5.0001.000

 

Intercompany transactions in different currencies

Let’s assume that company M in € makes a €10,000 loan to American subsidiary F during the year. F receives the loan and records it in its accounts in $.

For this purpose, it converts the €10,000 at the rate of the day on which the loan was received, i.e. 1.2 in our example. The €10,000 loan is worth $12,000 in F’s accounts.

Clearly, if we only look at the individual cash flow statements of M and F, there is no problem.

There is a cash outflow of €10,000 on one hand, and an inflow of $12,000 on the other.

Now, let’s take a closer look at the consolidated cash flow statement.

All intercompany transactions are reconciled then eliminated during the consolidation process.

As balance sheet accounts are converted at the closing rate, transactions between companies such as loans and receivables are reconciled at that rate.

On the other hand, the movements for the year will be converted at the average rate. This is the conversion that will cause trouble in the cash flow statement.

For our example, let’s assume an average €/$ exchange rate of 1.25 and, to simplify, keep the closing rate of 1.2.

The first table shows the change in the debt item at F, first in $ then converted into € before the transaction is eliminated during consolidation, then after the transaction is eliminated.

F in $F in € before IC elim.F in € after IC elim.
Opening N000
Change in cash12.0009.600 (12.000$ / 1.25)0
Translation adjustment04000
Closing N12.00010.000 (12.000$ / 1.2)0

 

It quickly becomes apparent that no information about changes in the debt item at F is available in the consolidated statements.

This will create a problem when preparing the consolidated cash flow statement because we are no longer able to differentiate between the real cash movement, i.e. €9,600, and the currency difference of €400 which is non-cash by nature and, as a result, cannot appear in the consolidated cash flow statement.

 

The second table shows the impact of this intercompany transaction on the consolidated cash flow statement.

 

F in € before IC elim.M in €M + F in € after IC elim.
Mvt on the loan/debt9.600-10.0000
Change in cash9.600-10.000-400
Difference00-400

 

After the elimination of the intercompany transaction which, it should be noted, is reconciled because the $12,000 converted at the closing rate does give us €10,000, we no longer have any information on the flows.

In fact, there was no loan at the beginning of the period and the transaction is eliminated at the close.

On the other hand, the change in cash provides us with a cash outflow (the loan by M) of €10,000 and a cash inflow of €9,600, i.e. the $12,000 loan received by F and converted at the average exchange rate of the financial period.

The change in cash of €400 at the group level is due to the change in currency and should be explained as such. However, we can’t do this because there isn’t any information about the loan and borrowing account flows (see the first table in this chapter).

Having presented the main currency exchange problems, we should also take a look at consolidation adjustments.

This article is too short to go into great detail on the topic. We’ll illustrate the subject with two examples.

 

Acquisition/disposal of consolidated holdings

 

The fact that consolidated equity investments are eliminated during the consolidation process can result in problems when preparing the consolidated cash flow statement.

How can we find the cash amount of the purchase or disposal of securities when there is nothing at the consolidated level in the balance sheet account, at opening or at close?

Let’s take a look at another example.

Company M in € acquires 100% of subsidiary F in € for €500,000.

Let’s compare what this means in the statutory cash flow statement and in the consolidated cash flow statement in the table below.

 

M statutory accountsM consolidated accounts
Acquisition of LT invest.-500.0000
Change in cash-500.000-500.000
Difference0-500.000

 

Adjustment posting for a currency difference on intercompany transactions

M has revenue of €100 vis-à-vis F, a fully-consolidated subsidiary in USD.

F records a corresponding charge vis-à-vis M in the amount of $120, i.e. €110 when converted at the average rate.

The difference of €10 is a currency exchange difference which has to be adjusted in the consolidation via the following entry:

 

IC charge10=> cash movement
Unrealised translation adjustment10  => non-cash movement

 

Let’s look at the result in the statutory and consolidated cash flow statements.

Note that we’ll only consider the indirect method for creating the cash flow statement. We will, therefore, exclude the direct method, which is not used very much in practice, although it is recommended by international rules.

 

F in €M in €Consolidation entryM + F
Result-110100+10 IC charge – 10 EC-10
Non-cash mvt adjustment001010
Change in cash-1101000-10
Difference0010-10

 

The fact that, in the consolidation entry, the charge is intercompany and the translation adjustment isn’t, creates a difference in the cash flow because the charge is eliminated by the consolidation process and the translation adjustment remains.

This results in an imbalance in the consolidated cash flow statement as shown in the table above.

In conclusion, the few examples presented in this article show how difficult it is to create a consolidated cash flow statement, whereas it’s relatively easy to produce a statutory cash flow statement.

We sometimes forget that it shouldn’t juggle with the concepts of currency exchange, intercompany transactions, securities and stockholders’ equity elimination entries, account consolidation methods, etc.

Fortunately, current consolidation software enables fairly automatic configuration of the consolidated cash flow statement. However, given the complexity of the task, manual intervention by the consolidation manager is often still required to prepare this statement.Jean-Luc Squifflet, Senior Consultant at Sigma Conso” width=”150″ height=”150″ />

 

Pourquoi est-il si difficile de publier un tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé sans écart, alors que tous les tableaux calculés au niveau des entités individuelles sont corrects?

Et donc, par conséquent, pourquoi cela prend-il autant de temps?

 

Ce sont des questions qui reviennent périodiquement au moment de la sortie des comptes annuels, et c’est à celles-ci que nous allons tenter de répondre dans cet article.

Pour ce faire, nous exposerons une série de problèmes qui se posent lors de l’élaboration d’un cash flow statement consolidé et qui, par contre, n’apparaissent pas dans les tableaux individuels calculés au niveau de chaque société du groupe.

Nous n’avons pas l’intention dans cet exposé d’être exhaustif quant aux problèmes rencontrés, mais simplement de faire comprendre au lecteur toute la difficulté de passer d’un tableau de flux de trésorerie individuel à un tableau consolidé.

Nous commençons par un petit rappel théorique.

Le but du tableau des flux de trésorerie (ou cash flow statement) est d’expliquer la variation de trésorerie entre deux exercices comptables. Ces variations de trésorerie sont réparties en trois catégories: cash flow opérationnel, cash flow d’investissement et cash flow de financement.

Le tableau des flux de trésorerie s’établit à partir des mouvements de l’année sur les comptes de bilan et de l’information contenue dans le compte de résultat.

Pour traduire ces mouvements, les consolideurs utilisent la notion de “flux” de manière à identifier sur chaque poste bilantaire les variations ayant un impact sur la trésorerie (mouvements “cash”) et celles sans impact tels que les variations de change, d’entrée ou de sortie de périmètre (mouvements “non-cash”).

A ce niveau, nous pouvons déjà identifier une différence majeure entre un tableau des flux de trésorerie individuel et un tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

En effet, le tableau individuel s’établit en devise locale alors que le consolidé est construit en devise groupe.

Comme il s’agit de variations entre deux périodes, le taux de change utilisé par défaut pour convertir les flux est le taux moyen de la période.

En bref, la variation de trésorerie est convertie au taux moyen et, a priori, les mouvements cashs repris dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé également.

C’est ici que les choses se compliquent car, pour certaines opérations, ce n’est pas le taux moyen qui sera utilisé.

Nous allons envisager, à titre d’exemple, différents cas qui montrent qu’une conversion de flux à un taux différent du taux moyen pose problème dans l’élaboration du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

Dividende distribué aux minoritaires en devise étrangère.

Les dividendes distribués à l’intérieur du groupe étant éliminés en consolidation, seuls apparaîtront dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé les dividendes versés aux tiers.

Comme il s’agit de la distribution du résultat de l’année antérieure, le taux utilisé pour convertir un dividende en monnaie étrangère dans la devise du groupe  sera a fortiori le taux moyen de l’exercice précédent.

Par contre, la variation de trésorerie liée à cette sortie de dividende sera convertie au taux moyen de l’exercice en cours.

Prenons un exemple pour visualiser ce que cela donne dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

Soit la société M en € détenant une filiale américaine F à 80%.

Au cours de l’exercice N, F distribue 100 USD de dividende relatif au résultat de la période N-1. Le taux moyen de l’exercice en cours est de 0.7 et celui de N-1 de 0.9.

 

F en $F en €M + F en €
Dividende distribué-100-90 (-100 $ * 0.9)-18 (-90 * 20%)
Variation de trésorerie-100-70 (-100 $ * 0.7)-14 (-70 * 20%)
Différence0+20+4

 

Augmentation de capital en devise souscrite par les tiers

Reprenons notre exemple où la société M détient 80% d’une filiale américaine F.

Supposons que F réalise une augmentation de capital de 100.000 $ à laquelle M souscrit à hauteur de son pourcentage.

Le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé ne montrera que la part des tiers dans cette augmentation de capital c.à.d. l’apport externe d’argent, soit 20.000$.

Si la variation des fonds propres de F était convertie au taux moyen, il n’y aurait aucun problème de cash flow, mais il arrive bien souvent qu’un taux de transaction (encore appelé taux historique) soit utilisé pour convertir l’augmentation de capital dans la devise du groupe.

Pour notre exemple, prenons 0.75 comme taux du jour de la transaction et 0.8 comme taux moyen de l’année, taux qui sera utilisé pour la conversion de la variation de trésorerie.

 

F en $F en €M + F en €
Augmentation de capital+100.000+75.000 (100.000$ * 0.75)15.000 (75 K€ *20%)
Variation de trésorerie+100.000+80.000 (100.000$ * 0.8)16.000 (80K€ * 20%)
Différence0+5.0001.000

 

Transactions intersociétés en différentes devises

 

Considérons que notre société M en € fasse un prêt de 10.000 € à la filiale américaine F au cours de l’année. F reçoit ce prêt et l’enregistre dans ses comptes en $.

Pour ce faire, elle convertit les 10.000€ au taux du jour de la réception du prêt, soit 1.2 pour notre exemple. Le prêt de 10.000€ vaut donc 12.000 $ dans les comptes de F.

Il est évident que, si on se limite à regarder les tableau des flux de trésorerie individuels de M et F, il n’y a aucun problème.

On constate une sortie de cash de10.000€ d’un côté et une entrée de 12.000$ de l’autre.

Maintenant, concentrons-nous sur le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

Au cours du processus de consolidation, toutes les transactions intersociétés sont réconciliées et ensuite éliminées.

Comme les comptes bilantaires sont convertis au taux de clôture, les transactions entre sociétés tels que les prêts et créances seront réconciliées à ce taux.

Par contre, les mouvements de l’année seront convertis au taux moyen, et c’est cette conversion qui va poser problème dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie.

 

Pour notre exemple, prenons un taux moyen de 1.25 entre l’Euro et le $ et gardons par facilité le taux de clôture de 1.2.

Le premier tableau nous donne l’évolution du poste de dette chez F, d’abord en $, puis converti en € avant l’élimination de la transaction en consolidation et ensuite après élimination de la transaction.

F en $F en € avant élim. ICF en € après élim. IC
Ouverture N000
Variation cash12.0009.600 (12.000$ / 1.25)0
Ecart de change04000
Clôture N12.00010.000 (12.000$ / 1.2)0

 

On constate assez vite que plus aucune information n’est disponible au niveau des comptes consolidés quant à l’évolution du poste de dette chez F.

Cela va poser problème dans l’établissement du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé car nous n’arrivons plus à faire la distinction entre le vrai mouvement cash, soit 9.600€, et la variation de change de 400€, non-cash par nature et qui, par conséquent, ne peut apparaître dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

Le deuxième tableau nous montre l’impact de cette transaction intersociétés sur le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

F en € avant élim. ICM en €M + F en € après élim IC
Mvt sur prêt/dette9.600-10.0000
Variation de trésorerie9.600-10.000-400
Différence00-400

 

Après l’élimination de la transaction intersociétés qui, soit dit en passant, est réconciliée car les 12.000$ convertis au taux de clôture nous donne bien 10.000€, nous ne disposons plus d’aucune information sur les flux.

En effet, à l’ouverture de la période il n’y avait pas de prêt, et à la clôture, la transaction est éliminée.

Par contre, la variation de trésorerie nous donne une sortie de cash (le prêt par M) de 10.000€ et une entrée de cash de 9.600€, soit l’emprunt de 12.000$ reçu par F et converti au taux moyen de l’exercice.

 

Cette variation de trésorerie de 400€ au niveau du groupe est due à une variation de change, et devrait être expliquée comme telle, mais on ne peut le faire, faute d’informations sur les flux des comptes de prêt et emprunt (cfr. le premier tableau de ce chapitre).

Après avoir exposé les principaux problèmes liés à la conversion des devises, nous nous devons d’aborder également celui des retraitements de consolidation.

 

Cet article est trop court pour pouvoir être exhaustif à ce sujet et nous allons donc simplement illustrer notre propos à l’aide de deux exemples.

 

Acquisition/cession de participations consolidées

 

Le fait que les titres de participations consolidées sont éliminés lors du processus de consolidation peut poser problème dans l’élaboration du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

En effet, comment retrouver le montant cash relatif à l’achat ou à la cession de titres alors qu’il n’y a rien sur le compte bilantaire au niveau consolidé, ni à l’ouverture, ni à la clôture?

 

Voyons cela à l’aide d’un petit exemple.

Soit la société M en € qui achète 100% d’une filiale F en € pour 500.000€.

Comparons maintenant à l’aide du tableau ci-dessous ce que cela donne dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie statutaire et dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

M comptes statutairesM comptes consolidés
Acquisition d’immos fin.-500.0000
Variation de trésorerie-500.000-500.000
Différence0-500.000

 

Ecriture de correction due à une différence de change sur transaction intersociétés

 

Soit M ayant un chiffre d’affaires de 100€ vis-à-vis de F, filiale en USD intégrée globalement.

F enregistre une charge correspondante vis-à-vis de M pour un montant de 120$, soit 110€ une fois converti au taux moyen.

L’écart de 10€ est bien une différence de change qu’il y a lieu de corriger en consolidation par l’écriture suivante :

 

Charge IC10=> mouvement cash
Ecart de change non réalisé10  => mouvement non cash

 

Voyons ce que cela donne dans les tableaux des flux de trésorerie statutaires et consolidé.

Notez que nous envisageons uniquement la méthode indirecte pour l’établissement du tableau de trésorerie et que nous excluons par conséquent la méthode directe, très peu utilisée dans la pratique, bien que préconisée par les règles internationales.

 

F en €M en €Ecriture de consoM + F
Résultat-110100+10 charge IC – 10 EC-10
Correction mvt non cash001010
Variation de trésorerie-1101000-10
Différence0010-10

 

Le fait que, dans l’écriture de consolidation, la charge soit intersociétés et pas l’écart de change, provoque au final un écart dans le cash flow car la charge est éliminée par le processus de consolidation alors que l’écart de change reste.

Il en résulte un déséquilibre dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé comme le montre le tableau ci-dessus.

 

En conclusion, les quelques exemples présentés dans cet article montrent à quel point il est difficile d’établir un tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé, alors qu’il est relativement aisé de produire un cash flow statutaire.

On oublie parfois que celui-ci ne doit pas jongler avec des notions de conversion de devise, de transactions intersociétés, d’écritures d’élimination de titres et de fonds propres, de différentes méthodes d’intégration de comptes, etc…

 

Heureusement les logiciels de consolidation actuels permettent un paramétrage relativement automatique du tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé, mais vu la complexité de la tâche, il n’en demeure pas moins qu’une intervention manuelle du consolideur est souvent nécessaire à la réalisation de ce tableau.English Text”” width=”150″ height=”150″ />

 

Pourquoi est-il si difficile de publier un tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé sans écart, alors que tous les tableaux calculés au niveau des entités individuelles sont corrects?

Et donc, par conséquent, pourquoi cela prend-il autant de temps?

 

Ce sont des questions qui reviennent périodiquement au moment de la sortie des comptes annuels, et c’est à celles-ci que nous allons tenter de répondre dans cet article.

Pour ce faire, nous exposerons une série de problèmes qui se posent lors de l’élaboration d’un cash flow statement consolidé et qui, par contre, n’apparaissent pas dans les tableaux individuels calculés au niveau de chaque société du groupe.

Nous n’avons pas l’intention dans cet exposé d’être exhaustif quant aux problèmes rencontrés, mais simplement de faire comprendre au lecteur toute la difficulté de passer d’un tableau de flux de trésorerie individuel à un tableau consolidé.

Nous commençons par un petit rappel théorique.

Le but du tableau des flux de trésorerie (ou cash flow statement) est d’expliquer la variation de trésorerie entre deux exercices comptables. Ces variations de trésorerie sont réparties en trois catégories: cash flow opérationnel, cash flow d’investissement et cash flow de financement.

Le tableau des flux de trésorerie s’établit à partir des mouvements de l’année sur les comptes de bilan et de l’information contenue dans le compte de résultat.

Pour traduire ces mouvements, les consolideurs utilisent la notion de “flux” de manière à identifier sur chaque poste bilantaire les variations ayant un impact sur la trésorerie (mouvements “cash”) et celles sans impact tels que les variations de change, d’entrée ou de sortie de périmètre (mouvements “non-cash”).

A ce niveau, nous pouvons déjà identifier une différence majeure entre un tableau des flux de trésorerie individuel et un tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

En effet, le tableau individuel s’établit en devise locale alors que le consolidé est construit en devise groupe.

Comme il s’agit de variations entre deux périodes, le taux de change utilisé par défaut pour convertir les flux est le taux moyen de la période.

En bref, la variation de trésorerie est convertie au taux moyen et, a priori, les mouvements cashs repris dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé également.

C’est ici que les choses se compliquent car, pour certaines opérations, ce n’est pas le taux moyen qui sera utilisé.

Nous allons envisager, à titre d’exemple, différents cas qui montrent qu’une conversion de flux à un taux différent du taux moyen pose problème dans l’élaboration du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

Dividende distribué aux minoritaires en devise étrangère.

Les dividendes distribués à l’intérieur du groupe étant éliminés en consolidation, seuls apparaîtront dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé les dividendes versés aux tiers.

Comme il s’agit de la distribution du résultat de l’année antérieure, le taux utilisé pour convertir un dividende en monnaie étrangère dans la devise du groupe  sera a fortiori le taux moyen de l’exercice précédent.

Par contre, la variation de trésorerie liée à cette sortie de dividende sera convertie au taux moyen de l’exercice en cours.

Prenons un exemple pour visualiser ce que cela donne dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

Soit la société M en € détenant une filiale américaine F à 80%.

Au cours de l’exercice N, F distribue 100 USD de dividende relatif au résultat de la période N-1. Le taux moyen de l’exercice en cours est de 0.7 et celui de N-1 de 0.9.

 

F en $F en €M + F en €
Dividende distribué-100-90 (-100 $ * 0.9)-18 (-90 * 20%)
Variation de trésorerie-100-70 (-100 $ * 0.7)-14 (-70 * 20%)
Différence0+20+4

 

Augmentation de capital en devise souscrite par les tiers

Reprenons notre exemple où la société M détient 80% d’une filiale américaine F.

Supposons que F réalise une augmentation de capital de 100.000 $ à laquelle M souscrit à hauteur de son pourcentage.

Le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé ne montrera que la part des tiers dans cette augmentation de capital c.à.d. l’apport externe d’argent, soit 20.000$.

Si la variation des fonds propres de F était convertie au taux moyen, il n’y aurait aucun problème de cash flow, mais il arrive bien souvent qu’un taux de transaction (encore appelé taux historique) soit utilisé pour convertir l’augmentation de capital dans la devise du groupe.

Pour notre exemple, prenons 0.75 comme taux du jour de la transaction et 0.8 comme taux moyen de l’année, taux qui sera utilisé pour la conversion de la variation de trésorerie.

 

F en $F en €M + F en €
Augmentation de capital+100.000+75.000 (100.000$ * 0.75)15.000 (75 K€ *20%)
Variation de trésorerie+100.000+80.000 (100.000$ * 0.8)16.000 (80K€ * 20%)
Différence0+5.0001.000

 

Transactions intersociétés en différentes devises

 

Considérons que notre société M en € fasse un prêt de 10.000 € à la filiale américaine F au cours de l’année. F reçoit ce prêt et l’enregistre dans ses comptes en $.

Pour ce faire, elle convertit les 10.000€ au taux du jour de la réception du prêt, soit 1.2 pour notre exemple. Le prêt de 10.000€ vaut donc 12.000 $ dans les comptes de F.

Il est évident que, si on se limite à regarder les tableau des flux de trésorerie individuels de M et F, il n’y a aucun problème.

On constate une sortie de cash de10.000€ d’un côté et une entrée de 12.000$ de l’autre.

Maintenant, concentrons-nous sur le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

Au cours du processus de consolidation, toutes les transactions intersociétés sont réconciliées et ensuite éliminées.

Comme les comptes bilantaires sont convertis au taux de clôture, les transactions entre sociétés tels que les prêts et créances seront réconciliées à ce taux.

Par contre, les mouvements de l’année seront convertis au taux moyen, et c’est cette conversion qui va poser problème dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie.

 

Pour notre exemple, prenons un taux moyen de 1.25 entre l’Euro et le $ et gardons par facilité le taux de clôture de 1.2.

Le premier tableau nous donne l’évolution du poste de dette chez F, d’abord en $, puis converti en € avant l’élimination de la transaction en consolidation et ensuite après élimination de la transaction.

F en $F en € avant élim. ICF en € après élim. IC
Ouverture N000
Variation cash12.0009.600 (12.000$ / 1.25)0
Ecart de change04000
Clôture N12.00010.000 (12.000$ / 1.2)0

 

On constate assez vite que plus aucune information n’est disponible au niveau des comptes consolidés quant à l’évolution du poste de dette chez F.

Cela va poser problème dans l’établissement du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé car nous n’arrivons plus à faire la distinction entre le vrai mouvement cash, soit 9.600€, et la variation de change de 400€, non-cash par nature et qui, par conséquent, ne peut apparaître dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

Le deuxième tableau nous montre l’impact de cette transaction intersociétés sur le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

F en € avant élim. ICM en €M + F en € après élim IC
Mvt sur prêt/dette9.600-10.0000
Variation de trésorerie9.600-10.000-400
Différence00-400

 

Après l’élimination de la transaction intersociétés qui, soit dit en passant, est réconciliée car les 12.000$ convertis au taux de clôture nous donne bien 10.000€, nous ne disposons plus d’aucune information sur les flux.

En effet, à l’ouverture de la période il n’y avait pas de prêt, et à la clôture, la transaction est éliminée.

Par contre, la variation de trésorerie nous donne une sortie de cash (le prêt par M) de 10.000€ et une entrée de cash de 9.600€, soit l’emprunt de 12.000$ reçu par F et converti au taux moyen de l’exercice.

 

Cette variation de trésorerie de 400€ au niveau du groupe est due à une variation de change, et devrait être expliquée comme telle, mais on ne peut le faire, faute d’informations sur les flux des comptes de prêt et emprunt (cfr. le premier tableau de ce chapitre).

Après avoir exposé les principaux problèmes liés à la conversion des devises, nous nous devons d’aborder également celui des retraitements de consolidation.

 

Cet article est trop court pour pouvoir être exhaustif à ce sujet et nous allons donc simplement illustrer notre propos à l’aide de deux exemples.

 

Acquisition/cession de participations consolidées

 

Le fait que les titres de participations consolidées sont éliminés lors du processus de consolidation peut poser problème dans l’élaboration du tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

En effet, comment retrouver le montant cash relatif à l’achat ou à la cession de titres alors qu’il n’y a rien sur le compte bilantaire au niveau consolidé, ni à l’ouverture, ni à la clôture?

 

Voyons cela à l’aide d’un petit exemple.

Soit la société M en € qui achète 100% d’une filiale F en € pour 500.000€.

Comparons maintenant à l’aide du tableau ci-dessous ce que cela donne dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie statutaire et dans le tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé.

 

M comptes statutairesM comptes consolidés
Acquisition d’immos fin.-500.0000
Variation de trésorerie-500.000-500.000
Différence0-500.000

 

Ecriture de correction due à une différence de change sur transaction intersociétés

 

Soit M ayant un chiffre d’affaires de 100€ vis-à-vis de F, filiale en USD intégrée globalement.

F enregistre une charge correspondante vis-à-vis de M pour un montant de 120$, soit 110€ une fois converti au taux moyen.

L’écart de 10€ est bien une différence de change qu’il y a lieu de corriger en consolidation par l’écriture suivante :

 

Charge IC10=> mouvement cash
Ecart de change non réalisé10  => mouvement non cash

 

Voyons ce que cela donne dans les tableaux des flux de trésorerie statutaires et consolidé.

Notez que nous envisageons uniquement la méthode indirecte pour l’établissement du tableau de trésorerie et que nous excluons par conséquent la méthode directe, très peu utilisée dans la pratique, bien que préconisée par les règles internationales.

 

F en €M en €Ecriture de consoM + F
Résultat-110100+10 charge IC – 10 EC-10
Correction mvt non cash001010
Variation de trésorerie-1101000-10
Différence0010-10

 

Le fait que, dans l’écriture de consolidation, la charge soit intersociétés et pas l’écart de change, provoque au final un écart dans le cash flow car la charge est éliminée par le processus de consolidation alors que l’écart de change reste.

Il en résulte un déséquilibre dans le tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé comme le montre le tableau ci-dessus.

 

En conclusion, les quelques exemples présentés dans cet article montrent à quel point il est difficile d’établir un tableau des flux de trésorerie consolidé, alors qu’il est relativement aisé de produire un cash flow statutaire.

On oublie parfois que celui-ci ne doit pas jongler avec des notions de conversion de devise, de transactions intersociétés, d’écritures d’élimination de titres et de fonds propres, de différentes méthodes d’intégration de comptes, etc…

 

Heureusement les logiciels de consolidation actuels permettent un paramétrage relativement automatique du tableau de flux de trésorerie consolidé, mais vu la complexité de la tâche, il n’en demeure pas moins qu’une intervention manuelle du consolideur est souvent nécessaire à la réalisation de ce tableau.

Consolidation using a spreadsheet versus consolidation software

“I currently do my consolidations on a spreadsheet. When will it become necessary to invest […]

Download the white paper
Share this article :
Discover Sigma Conso Consolidation & Reporting
Sigma Conso Consolidation & Reporting is a unified consolidation and reporting software application. It is web native and provides complete data traceability and powerful internal and external reporting functionality.
Recent articles
IFRS 16 timeline: which deadlines do you need to adhere to? IFRS 16 is compulsory […]
User Day Sigma Conso 2017 – Report On the 17th of October, Sigma Conso has […]
X